Heavily Soiled Terracotta Kitchen & Conservatory, Whitstable, Kent

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Three, centuries' old, terraced workman's cottages had been knocked through to make one house in Whitstable. Thick walls and small windows gave the home a charm on a quiet back street.

The floors had been neglected for years and this was, in my experience, probably the most ingrained dirt that I had come across.

No matter, this was something that I could improve and took on the job.

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Cleaning the grout was the first job of the day. The wide grout lines made for plenty of scrubbing with a stiff brush and a strong alkaline cleaning solution.

 

Terracotta is a very soft stone and burnishing/hone is not possible.

Using only one diamond pad with the same, industrial-strength alkaline cleaner is needed (and plenty of water!).

 

Soon, we were ankle deep in a very red, watery slurry that had to be vax'd up before it dried back in the cleaned grout lines. 

Normally, a day to leave the tiles to dry is sufficient before sealing but with terracotta, it is like a sponge so a Friday/Monday combination is preferred by me.

The customer opted for a matt finish, so a solvent-based matt finish sealer was used with a colour intensifier component.

Although it is a clear liquid, the colour intensifier makes the reds redder and the oranges more orange, adding depth and vibrancy to a matt floor.

Three coats were applied. I left a neutral Ph cleaner to clean the floors which should allow for a maximum protection time of 3 years.

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Feedback:

Graham did an excellent job thank you

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